[vc_section css=”.vc_custom_1561319733840{margin-top: 62px !important;}”][vc_row][vc_column][vc_separator color=”black” align=”align_left” border_width=”4″ el_width=”10″ css=”.vc_custom_1561292883831{margin-top: 72px !important;}” el_class=”about-line”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text el_class=”film-title” css=”.vc_custom_1561320142262{padding-right: 100px !important;}”]MY LIFE IS FULL BECAUSE I KNOW THAT I AM LOVED[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text el_class=”film-desc”]THIS REALISATION MOTIVATES US TO DO WHAT WE DO.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text el_class=”film-info”]“We can raise awareness of the problem of child poverty and homelessness. We can influence public opinion by delivering messages to politicians and authorities who have the resources and the opportunities to improve the situation. We can attract the attention of the media, which has tremendous power to influence public opinion and spark change for the better. Through minor efforts, we can be major advocates for change”.

Hanna Polak – founder of the Active Child Aid ( The State of The World’s – UNICEF 2010)[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][/vc_section][vc_section css=”.vc_custom_1548875550008{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}” el_class=”non-mobile”][vc_row rtl_reverse=”yes”][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_single_image image=”197″ img_size=”full” css=”.vc_custom_1561316604755{margin-bottom: 22px !important;}”][vc_column_text el_class=”film-info”]When this film was made, authorities estimated that some 30,000 children were living on the streets and railway stations of Moscow. The Children of Leningradsky concentrates on a dozen or so children living in the Moscow train station Leningradsky. Panhandling from strangers and sleeping among the rush of commuters, their wants are minimal. “We need some heat, food, a little money and nothing more,” says one, forgetting that his daily diet also includes an unhealthy dose of vodka, cigarettes and glue sniffing. “When it is worst, we try to make money for food by prostitution,” admits another. 

Police brutality is a daily reality for the children of Leningradsky. The film captures one incident where the police patrol beats one of the street children and smears an entire tube of glue into his hair and onto his face. Ironically, it is by sniffing glue fumes that these children (at least for a little while) are able escape the unforgiving world around them. It is a life of fleeting possibilities and danger. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″ css=”.vc_custom_1561316222615{padding-left: 30px !important;}”][vc_single_image image=”142″ img_size=”full” css=”.vc_custom_1548453036579{margin-bottom: -35px !important;}”][vc_wp_text el_class=”film-title”]THE CHILDREN OF LENINGRADSKY[/vc_wp_text][vc_column_text el_class=”film-desc” css=”.vc_custom_1561315343484{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 33px !important;}”]NOMINATED FOR AN ACADEMY AWARD FOR BEST SHORT DOCUMENTARY, SHORT SUBJECT.[/vc_column_text][vc_raw_html css=”.vc_custom_1561321318067{margin-bottom: -20px !important;}”]JTNDYSUyMGNsYXNzJTNEJTIyYnV0dG9uJTIwJTIwYnV0dG9uX3NpemVfMiUyMGJ1dHRvbl9qcyUyMiUyMGhyZWYlM0QlMjJodHRwJTNBJTJGJTJGd3d3LmNoaWxkcmVub2ZsZW5pbmdyYWRza3kuY29tJTIyJTIwc3R5bGUlM0QlMjJiYWNrZ3JvdW5kLWNvbG9yJTNBJTIzQjM3NzQxJTNCJTIwY29sb3IlM0F3aGl0ZSUyMiUyMHRhcmdldCUzRCUyMl9ibGFuayUyMiUzRSUzQ3NwYW4lMjBjbGFzcyUzRCUyMmJ1dHRvbl9sYWJlbCUyMiUzRVdBVENIJTIwVFJBSUxFUiUzQyUyRnNwYW4lM0UlM0MlMkZhJTNF[/vc_raw_html][vc_column_text el_class=”film-info” css=”.vc_custom_1561316372291{margin-top: 33px !important;}”]This 35-minute documentary, takes an unblinking look at the reality of homeless children living in Russia today – in particular the ones who call the underground Leningradsky train station in Moscow home. Utilizing verité footage of over a dozen children who speak candidly about their lives, routines and lost dreams, the film captures the sobering reality of post-Soviet Russia, as kids are left behind, get booted out of their homes, turn into prostitutes, are abused, and run away. Though it has been making efforts to overcome this dire situation, the Russian system has yet to completely control it, as many young children (ages 8-16) continue to be swept into the abyss. 

The Children of Leningradsky conveys what life is like for these homeless children as they plan their day around “best begging hours.” Originally part of a project to bring money and aid to homeless youth, Polak and Celinski started filming this documentary as a non-profit initiative. The film has helped focus attention on this matter; since it was made, Russian authorities have stepped up their efforts to reduce homelessness in Moscow, though it’s still a serious problem in other cities. 

Death sometimes crosses the paths of the children of Leningradsky, directly and indirectly. One group of kids explains how they were badgered for 48 hours by police after another child was murdered, even though they weren’t anywhere near the crime scene. In another, far more emotional scene, a group of homeless children wail at the funeral of a pretty 14-year-old girl. Neverless, Misha, the boy who was discarded by his father, remains optimistic: “God believes in people and helps them. He loves everyone, even bad people, not just Russians. He even loves Chechnyans. But most of all, He loves children.” [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][/vc_section][vc_section css=”.vc_custom_1548875539357{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}” el_class=”mobile”][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_single_image image=”142″ img_size=”full” css=”.vc_custom_1548877747660{margin-bottom: -35px !important;}” el_id=”#oscar-nomination”][vc_wp_text el_class=”film-title”]THE CHILDREN OF LENINGRADSKY[/vc_wp_text][vc_single_image image=”197″ img_size=”full” css=”.vc_custom_1548878076825{margin-top: -10px !important;}”][vc_column_text el_class=”film-desc” css=”.vc_custom_1548878064027{margin-top: -45px !important;}”]NOMINATED FOR AN ACADEMY AWARD FOR BEST SHORT DOCUMENTARY, SHORT SUBJECT.[/vc_column_text][vc_raw_html css=”.vc_custom_1561321297576{margin-top: -15px !important;}”]JTNDYSUyMGNsYXNzJTNEJTIyYnV0dG9uJTIwJTIwYnV0dG9uX3NpemVfMiUyMGJ1dHRvbl9qcyUyMiUyMGhyZWYlM0QlMjJodHRwJTNBJTJGJTJGd3d3LmNoaWxkcmVub2ZsZW5pbmdyYWRza3kuY29tJTIyJTIwc3R5bGUlM0QlMjJiYWNrZ3JvdW5kLWNvbG9yJTNBJTIzQjM3NzQxJTNCJTIwY29sb3IlM0F3aGl0ZSUyMiUyMHRhcmdldCUzRCUyMl9ibGFuayUyMiUzRSUzQ3NwYW4lMjBjbGFzcyUzRCUyMmJ1dHRvbl9sYWJlbCUyMiUzRVdBVENIJTIwVFJBSUxFUiUzQyUyRnNwYW4lM0UlM0MlMkZhJTNF[/vc_raw_html][vc_column_text el_class=”film-info” css=”.vc_custom_1561317172405{margin-top: -35px !important;}”]When this film was made, authorities estimated that some 30,000 children were living on the streets and railway stations of Moscow. The Children of Leningradsky concentrates on a dozen or so children living in the Moscow train station Leningradsky. Panhandling from strangers and sleeping among the rush of commuters, their wants are minimal. “We need some heat, food, a little money and nothing more,” says one, forgetting that his daily diet also includes an unhealthy dose of vodka, cigarettes and glue sniffing. “When it is worst, we try to make money for food by prostitution,” admits another.

Police brutality is a daily reality for the children of Leningradsky. The film captures one incident where the police patrol beats one of the street children and smears an entire tube of glue into his hair and onto his face. Ironically, it is by sniffing glue fumes that these children (at least for a little while) are able escape the unforgiving world around them. It is a life of fleeting possibilities and danger.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text el_class=”film-info”]This 35-minute documentary, takes an unblinking look at the reality of homeless children living in Russia today – in particular the ones who call the underground Leningradsky train station in Moscow home. Utilizing verité footage of over a dozen children who speak candidly about their lives, routines and lost dreams, the film captures the sobering reality of post-Soviet Russia, as kids are left behind, get booted out of their homes, turn into prostitutes, are abused, and run away. Though it has been making efforts to overcome this dire situation, the Russian system has yet to completely control it, as many young children (ages 8-16) continue to be swept into the abyss.

The Children of Leningradsky conveys what life is like for these homeless children as they plan their day around “best begging hours.” Originally part of a project to bring money and aid to homeless youth, Polak and Celinski started filming this documentary as a non-profit initiative. The film has helped focus attention on this matter; since it was made, Russian authorities have stepped up their efforts to reduce homelessness in Moscow, though it’s still a serious problem in other cities.

Death sometimes crosses the paths of the children of Leningradsky, directly and indirectly. One group of kids explains how they were badgered for 48 hours by police after another child was murdered, even though they weren’t anywhere near the crime scene. In another, far more emotional scene, a group of homeless children wail at the funeral of a pretty 14-year-old girl. Neverless, Misha, the boy who was discarded by his father, remains optimistic: “God believes in people and helps them. He loves everyone, even bad people, not just Russians. He even loves Chechnyans. But most of all, He loves children.”[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][/vc_section][vc_section][vc_row][vc_column][vc_separator color=”black” align=”align_left” border_width=”4″ el_width=”10″ el_class=”about-line”][/vc_column][/vc_row][/vc_section][vc_section el_class=”non-mobile”][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_wp_text el_class=”film-title”]SOMETHING BETTER TO COME[/vc_wp_text][vc_wp_text el_class=”film-desc”]HER NAME IS YULA. SHE LIVES IN PUTIN’S RUSSIA.[/vc_wp_text][vc_raw_html css=”.vc_custom_1561321207100{margin-top: 30px !important;margin-bottom: 10px !important;}”]JTNDYSUyMGNsYXNzJTNEJTIyYnV0dG9uJTIwJTIwYnV0dG9uX3NpemVfMiUyMGJ1dHRvbl9qcyUyMiUyMGhyZWYlM0QlMjJodHRwcyUzQSUyRiUyRmhhbm5hcG9sYWtmaWxtcy5jb20lMjIlMjBzdHlsZSUzRCUyMmJhY2tncm91bmQtY29sb3IlM0ElMjNCMzc3NDElM0IlMjBjb2xvciUzQXdoaXRlJTIyJTIwdGFyZ2V0JTNEJTIyX2JsYW5rJTIyJTNFJTNDc3BhbiUyMGNsYXNzJTNEJTIyYnV0dG9uX2xhYmVsJTIyJTNFV0FUQ0glMjBUUkFJTEVSJTNDJTJGc3BhbiUzRSUzQyUyRmElM0U=[/vc_raw_html][vc_column_text el_class=”film-info”]Her home is the largest garbage dump in Europe. This is the story of her life.

Ten-year-old Yula has but one dream – to lead a normal life. For 14 YEARS, Oscar-nominated filmmaker Hanna Polak follows Yula as she grows up in the forbidden territory of Svalka, the garbage dump located 13 miles from the Kremlin in Putin’s Russia. SOMETHING BETTER TO COME is Yula’s story – a dramatic tale of coming of age and maturing to the point of taking destiny into one’s own hands. It is a story of hope, courage, and life, all shot in gripping vérité style that stuns with its directness and immediacy.

“A strikingly visceral and plaintively moving documentary that is arresting right from its first powerful moments.” – Mark Adams for Screen Daily

“This is a film that packs an emotional punch and is strikingly directed and shot by the talented Hanna Polak.” – Mark Adams for Screen Daily

“An eye-opening documentary” – Neil Young for The Hollywood Reporter

“An enriching experience and a remarkable project that aims and achieve to give voice to the voiceless, this film is at once strikingly real and impressively poetic due to its genuine portrayal of the situation of extreme poverty with an underlying sentiment of optimism.” – Matt Micucci for Cinecola

“Each edition of the IDFA you see a few pictures and faces you will not easily forget. The tears in the eyes of Yula, growing up between the garbage in Moscow, two weeks before the birth of her first child, is such a picture.” – Het Parool

“This film will make your jaw drop, thanks to Polak’s eye for optimism, humanity and birthday cake in a context of hopelessness that can hardly be believed.” – Volkskrant

“With this latest production from Polak, the sky is her limit.” – The Eagle Online

“Impressive.” – Marie Claire[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_single_image image=”198″ img_size=”full”][/vc_column][/vc_row][/vc_section][vc_section el_class=”mobile”][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_wp_text el_class=”film-title”]SOMETHING BETTER TO COME[/vc_wp_text][vc_single_image image=”198″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text el_class=”film-desc” css=”.vc_custom_1548878237548{margin-top: -45px !important;}”]HER NAME IS YULA. SHE LIVES IN PUTIN’S RUSSIA.[/vc_column_text][vc_raw_html css=”.vc_custom_1561321183530{margin-top: -15px !important;}”]JTNDYSUyMGNsYXNzJTNEJTIyYnV0dG9uJTIwJTIwYnV0dG9uX3NpemVfMiUyMGJ1dHRvbl9qcyUyMiUyMGhyZWYlM0QlMjJodHRwcyUzQSUyRiUyRmhhbm5hcG9sYWtmaWxtcy5jb20lMjIlMjBzdHlsZSUzRCUyMmJhY2tncm91bmQtY29sb3IlM0ElMjNCMzc3NDElM0IlMjBjb2xvciUzQXdoaXRlJTIyJTIwdGFyZ2V0JTNEJTIyX2JsYW5rJTIyJTNFJTNDc3BhbiUyMGNsYXNzJTNEJTIyYnV0dG9uX2xhYmVsJTIyJTNFV0FUQ0glMjBUUkFJTEVSJTNDJTJGc3BhbiUzRSUzQyUyRmElM0U=[/vc_raw_html][vc_column_text el_class=”film-info” css=”.vc_custom_1561317472177{margin-top: -35px !important;}”]Her home is the largest garbage dump in Europe. This is the story of her life.

Ten-year-old Yula has but one dream – to lead a normal life. For 14 YEARS, Oscar-nominated filmmaker Hanna Polak follows Yula as she grows up in the forbidden territory of Svalka, the garbage dump located 13 miles from the Kremlin in Putin’s Russia. SOMETHING BETTER TO COME is Yula’s story – a dramatic tale of coming of age and maturing to the point of taking destiny into one’s own hands. It is a story of hope, courage, and life, all shot in gripping vérité style that stuns with its directness and immediacy.

“A strikingly visceral and plaintively moving documentary that is arresting right from its first powerful moments.” – Mark Adams for Screen Daily

“This is a film that packs an emotional punch and is strikingly directed and shot by the talented Hanna Polak.” – Mark Adams for Screen Daily

“An eye-opening documentary” – Neil Young for The Hollywood Reporter

“An enriching experience and a remarkable project that aims and achieve to give voice to the voiceless, this film is at once strikingly real and impressively poetic due to its genuine portrayal of the situation of extreme poverty with an underlying sentiment of optimism.” – Matt Micucci for Cinecola

“Each edition of the IDFA you see a few pictures and faces you will not easily forget. The tears in the eyes of Yula, growing up between the garbage in Moscow, two weeks before the birth of her first child, is such a picture.” – Het Parool

“This film will make your jaw drop, thanks to Polak’s eye for optimism, humanity and birthday cake in a context of hopelessness that can hardly be believed.” – Volkskrant

“With this latest production from Polak, the sky is her limit.” – The Eagle Online

“Impressive.” – Marie Claire[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][/vc_section][vc_row][vc_column][vc_raw_html]JTNDYSUyMGNsYXNzJTNEJTIyYnV0dG9uJTIwJTIwYnV0dG9uX3NpemVfMiUyMGJ1dHRvbl9qcyUyMiUyMGhyZWYlM0QlMjJodHRwcyUzQSUyRiUyRmhhbm5hcG9sYWtmaWxtcy5jb20lMjIlMjBzdHlsZSUzRCUyMmJhY2tncm91bmQtY29sb3IlM0ElMjNCMzc3NDElM0IlMjBjb2xvciUzQXdoaXRlJTIyJTIwdGFyZ2V0JTNEJTIyX2JsYW5rJTIyJTNFJTNDc3BhbiUyMGNsYXNzJTNEJTIyYnV0dG9uX2xhYmVsJTIyJTNFUkVBRCUyME1PUkUlM0MlMkZzcGFuJTNFJTNDJTJGYSUzRQ==[/vc_raw_html][/vc_column][/vc_row]